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via source reblog posted 12 hours ago with 654 notes →
♚ masterlist of bad habits ♚

emmieofrp:

Below the cut you will a masterlist of 40+ bad habits for your character to have. Some of these bad habits are bad etiquette while some of them are bad speaking habits. Some of them are incredibly bad for your health and others are just unprofessional. Please like or reblog this post if it has helped you in any way!  

Read More

via source reblog posted 1 day ago with 1,199 notes →
Though from afar it’s easy to imagine the publishing business as either a collection of jaded gatekeepers who enjoy affirming their superiority by rejecting your work, or as a bunch of crass entertainment execs chasing the next megahit, I’ve been disappointed to find that it’s actually neither. Everyone who I’ve encountered in the book biz—from editorial to sales—seems disarmingly genuine about their love of books, and their jobs are pretty much like everyone else’s in the world, which is to say torn between reconciling their passion with the realities of the market. Every book they publish, especially if it’s by a first-time writer, is a risk to them and their reputation, and it’s one they take because they personally responded to the book. This was a revelation to me, the fact that the grand faceless facade of New York publishing turned out to be a collection of surprisingly normal people, all of whom were looking to fall in love with a manuscript.

-

Ted Thompson in Ask a Debut Novelist #2 (via rachelfershleiser)

THIS QUOTE. THIS QUOTE. THIS QUOTE

(via bookibookibooki)

Thank you, publishers, for taking those risks! 

(via nitatyndall)

via source reblog posted 2 days ago with 1,251 notes →
Advice & Tips on Metaphor and Symbolism

anaardvarkwrites:

While I do have a few essays and resources that would allow me to write something up on the theories of metaphors, I don’t find them that useful for application. So, instead, I am just going to describe a few processes that I do when I wish to add in some metaphors into my writing.

  • Sort By Character - The very beginning of my ‘metaphor construction’ process starts when I have created my character, or sometimes even during the midst of. For the purposes of explaining this, I am going to use one of my characters, who is called Saramil, as an example. Saramil is a young, wealthy member of high aristocracy, who works as a pastoral poet and social commentator to escape facing the prospect of inheriting his family’s (fairly boring, or at least he’d say so) land investment business. This kind of character naturally lends itself to images of gold and jewels, as obvious symbols of wealth, but what else can be taken out of these images?
  • Read Books With Similar Characters - While it seems to be every author’s goal to create a completely unique character, tropes and reoccurring patterns in literature are inescapable, but are necessary in the implementation of metaphors: established images make it more possible for readers to understand new creative metaphors, and are vital in forming conventional ones (an example of a conventional metaphor being “time is running out”). So, if you find a character in a book that is similar to yours in either goals or lifestyle, pay close attention to how the author describes them. Going back to the example of my character, a character that stuck with me was Daisy Buchanan from The Great Gatsby, and found the line “her hand was wet with glistening drops as I took it to help her from the car”. The idea of nature replicating a jewel had me come up with lines such as “dripping in cold gemstones” for my own descriptions.
  • Research The Object - What I mean by this is actually look into what you want to make a comparison with. So, say I want to use jewels as a reoccurring symbol for Saramil, my next step is to research jewels. Questions should naturally arise from this process: What kind of jewel? What colours? Does it have any historical or cultural context behind its symbol? If you are able to with the particular image in mind, try and get a hold of the actual item and look at it for yourself. After rummaging through my mother’s jewellery box and scanning through the catalogues of auction houses, I decided to align Saramil with the symbol of an opal, since these are jewels that aren’t one colour, and change with the light and perspective, just as I want his character to reflect. This also aligns quite nicely with Shakespeare’s usage of the symbol: in Twelfth Night, Feste tells Count Orsino that “thy mind is a very opal”, to refer to his easily-changeable mind.
  • Branch Out - Something I try to do with as many of my metaphors as possible is interconnect them. What I mean by this is, after I have my list of symbols for each character, I try to see what connects them together, with hopes that I can find something new. One example I have already included in this explanation: both raindrops and jewels are glistening, therefore the symbols can be simultaneously recognised by a reader. One of the most established focuses of symbolism in literature is that of light and dark. Light, as one of the first creations of God, is commonly linked to as goodness and purity, but it makes for a more intriguing read if one is to subvert established images like this. To do this, I linked the glittering light of reflections of gems with a gemstone’s physical coldness and lack of value to substance: gems are only worth their appearance, since they can be used for little else directly. With the wider imagery of “light” and “reflection” now attached to the character, lots of doors are opened for metaphorical possibility.
  • Don’t Delete Any Metaphors You Make - This is really a comment on all writing or artwork produced, but if you come up with a metaphor, but decide that you don’t think it fits your character, don’t delete it! Make a document for them, or keep them in a scrapbook if you hand-write.
  • If All Else Fails, Google - If you type in “[Insert Object Here] Symbolism” or “Symbols of [Insert Personality Trait Here]” into Google, you are bound to come up with results. Just be mindful of what you take as truthful in application of your character.

I hope that helps! I can’t say my writing ‘method’ is… Well, much of a method, but I tried to make the tips coherent. Happy writing!

via source reblog posted 3 days ago with 791 notes →

howtofightwrite:

Here’s some interesting info on how sharp medieval swords actually were, and how to actually use swords against plate armor.

Skullagrim has a lot of sword related videos up, including him taking a look at the practicality of various fictional weapon designs.

-Starke

via source reblog posted 4 days ago with 2,781 notes →
amandaonwriting:

Using Myths for Writing Prompts
Writing prompts are an excellent way to stay in good writing shape. We post a daily writing prompt on our Facebook page. It is also available on our Creative Blog. 

If you’re looking for some inspiration, you may enjoy an article I wrote last year about using Lyrics as Writing Prompts. I am always looking for new writing exercises, and I wanted to explore the concept of myths as prompts. I think this could be a great exercise for your writing group.

What is a myth?
A myth is a traditional, usually ancient story involving supernatural beings, ancestors, or heroes. It is used to explain aspects of the natural world or to show the psychology, customs, or ideals of a society. Myths exist in every culture across the globe. Examples include Eros and Psyche, the Myth of Creation, Daedalus and Iccarus,Noah and the Great Flood, the myth of Arthur and Camelot, and The Rain Queen.

Why don’t you write a myth using one of these ideas as inspiration?

by Amanda Patterson

amandaonwriting:

Using Myths for Writing Prompts

Writing prompts are an excellent way to stay in good writing shape. We post a daily writing prompt on our Facebook page. It is also available on our Creative Blog
If you’re looking for some inspiration, you may enjoy an article I wrote last year about using Lyrics as Writing Prompts. I am always looking for new writing exercises, and I wanted to explore the concept of myths as prompts. I think this could be a great exercise for your writing group.
What is a myth?
A myth is a traditional, usually ancient story involving supernatural beings, ancestors, or heroes. It is used to explain aspects of the natural world or to show the psychology, customs, or ideals of a society. Myths exist in every culture across the globe. Examples include Eros and Psyche, the Myth of CreationDaedalus and Iccarus,Noah and the Great Flood, the myth of Arthur and Camelot, and The Rain Queen.
Why don’t you write a myth using one of these ideas as inspiration?
by Amanda Patterson
via source reblog posted 5 days ago with 901 notes →
Powering through a very rough first draft

itsonlythefirstdraft:

…and not even the crumbling plot will stop you:
image

Suggested/Requested by Anonymous

via source reblog posted 6 days ago with 157,733 notes →
unexplained-events:

staragus:

unexplained-events:

When Caroline Walter of Freiburg, Germany died at the age of 16, her sister, ,Selma, had a sculptor cast a life size sculpture for the gravestone - Every morning since Caroline’s funeral, a fresh flower was found tucked in the crook of the arm, and still is to this day - Nobody knows who leaves it - Every single morning! - Caroline died in 1867 - For 146 years, someone has been leaving flowers…

Caroline totes had a vampire lover.

This is by far, my favorite theory.

unexplained-events:

staragus:

unexplained-events:

When Caroline Walter of Freiburg, Germany died at the age of 16, her sister, ,Selma, had a sculptor cast a life size sculpture for the gravestone - Every morning since Caroline’s funeral, a fresh flower was found tucked in the crook of the arm, and still is to this day - Nobody knows who leaves it - Every single morning! - Caroline died in 1867 - For 146 years, someone has been leaving flowers…

Caroline totes had a vampire lover.

This is by far, my favorite theory.

via source reblog posted 1 week ago with 8 notes →

thewritingrealm:

Hey, guys! I’m going to be spending a month in Australia, New Zealand, and Fiji! I’m doing homestays and such, surfing, scuba diving, and so much more so please bear with me while I’m gone- I’ll have a queue, don’t worry- and I’ll come back with so much information to share with you all for life and writing! 

via source reblog posted 1 week ago with 823 notes →
Write it. Shoot it. Publish it. Crochet it, sauté it, whatever. MAKE.

-

Joss Whedon

Book Geek Quote #539

(via bookgeekconfessions)

Pretty sure these are the lyrics to Technologic…

via source reblog posted 1 week ago with 247,721 notes →
thewritersarchive:

This is an ultimate masterlist of many, many resources that could be helpful for writers/roleplayers.
→ GENERAL
Improvement
Improve Your Writing Habits Now
5 Ways to Add Sparkle to Your Writing
Getting Over Roleplaying Insecurities
Improve Your Paras
Why the Right Word Choices Result in Better Writing
4 Ways To Have Confidence in Your Writing
Writing Better Than You Normally Do
How’s My Driving?
Describing
A Description Resource
55 Words to Describe Someones Voice
Describing Skin Colors
Describing a Person: Adding Details
Emotions Vocabulary
90 Words For ‘Looks’
Be More Descriptive
Describe a Character’s Look Well
100 Words for Facial Expressions
To Show and Not To Tell
Words to Describe Facial Expressions
Describing Clothes
List of Actions
Tone, Feelings and Emotions
Masterlists
Writing Specific Characters
Character Guides
Writing Help for Writers
Ultimate Writing Resource List
Lots of RP Guides
Online Writing Resources
List of Websites to Help You Focus
Resources for Writing Bio’s
Helpful Links for Writing Help
General Writing Resources
Resources for Biography Writing
Mental Ilnesses/Disorders Guides
8 Words You Should Avoid While Writing
  Body Language
Body Language Cheat
Body Language Reference Cheat
Tips for Writers: Body Language
Types of Crying
Body Language: Mirroring
Grammar/Vocabulary
Words Instead of Walk (2)
Commonly Confused Adjectives
A Guide on Punctuation
Common Writing Mistakes
25 Synoms for ‘Expession’
How to: Avoid Misusing Variations of Words
Words to Keep Inside Your Pocket
The 13 Trickiest Grammar Hang-Ups
Other Ways to Say..
Proofreading
300+ Sophiscated and Underused Words
List of Misused Words
Words for Sex
100 Beautiful and Ugly Words
Words to Use More Often
Alternatives for ‘Smile’ or ‘Laugh’
Three Self Editing Tips
Words to Use Instead of ‘Walk’, ‘Said’, ‘Happy’ and ‘Sad’
Synonyms for Common Words
Alternatives for ‘Smile’
Transitional Words
The Many Faces and Meanings of ‘Said’
Synonyms for ‘Wrote’
A Case Of She Said, She Said
Writer’s Block
How to: Cure Writer’s Block
Some Tips on Writer’s Block
Got Writer’s Block?
6 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block
Tips for Dealing With Writer’s Block
→ APPLICATIONS
Application (Itself)
How to: Make That Application Your Bitch
How to: Make Your App Better
How to: Submit a Flawless Audition
10 Tips for Applying
Para (Sample)
Para Sample Ideas
5 Tips on Writing an IC Para Sample
Writing an IC Sample Without Escaping From the Bio
How to: Create a Worthy IC Para Sample
How to: Write an Impressive Para Sample
How to: Lengthen Short Para’s
Prompts
Drabble Stuff
Prompts List
Writing Prompts
Drabble Prompts
How to Get Into Character
Writing Challenges/Prompts
A Study in Writing Prompts for RPs
Para Prompts & Ideas
Writing Prompts for Journal Entries
A List of Para Starters
→ GUIDES
Personalities
Angry
Bad Asses
Bitches (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
Childishness
Emotional Detachment
Flirtatious
The Girl Next Door
Introverts (2)
Mean Persons (2)
Psychopaths
Party Girls
Rich (2) 
Rebels
Sarcasm
Serial Killers (2)
Shyness (2, 3)
Sluts
Villains (2)
Witt
Disorders
Disorders in general (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Attention Deficit Disorder
Antisocial Personality Disorder
Anxiety (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Avoidant Personality Disorder
Alice In Wonderland Syndrome
Bipolar Disorder (2, 3)
Cotard Delusions
Depression (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)   
Eeating Disorders (2, 3)
Facitious Disorders
Histrionic Personality Disorder
Multiple Personality Disorder (2)
Narcissistic Personality Disorder
Night Terrors
Kleptomania (2)
A Pyromaniac
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Psychopaths
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (2) (3)
Sex Addiction (2)
Schizophrenia (2)
Sociopaths (2)
Disabilities
Aspergers Syndrome
Apathy 
Autism
Someone Blind (2)
Cancer (2, 3)
Disability
Dyslexia
Muteness (2, 3)
Stutter
Jobs/Hobbies/Beliefs
Actors
Ballet Dancer (2)
Christianity
Foreigners
Gamblers
Hinduism
Hitmen
Satanism
Smokers
Stoners
Taoism
Journalists
Vegetarians
Drugs
Alcohol Influence (2, 3, 4, 5)
Cocaine Influence
Ecstasy Influence (2)
Heroin Use
LSD Influence
Marijuana Influence (2, 3)
Opiate Use
Locations
Australia
Boston
California (2, 3)
England/Britain (2, 3, 4, 5)
New York
Prison
London
The South (2)
Genders
Females (2)
Males (2)
Transgender People
Supernatural
Vampires
Witches (2)
Werewolves
Other
Amnesia
Children
A Death Scene
Loosing Someone (2)
Old Persons
Physical Injuries (2, 3)
Sexual Abuse (2)
Fight Scenes (2, 3, 4)
Horror
Torture
→ CREATING CHARACTERS
Biography Writing
Components of Your Biographies
Character sheet (2, 3)
Need Help With Character Creation?
How to: Draw Inspiration for Characters From Music
How to: Write a Biography (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11)
How to: Write a Fully Developed Character
How to: Create a Cast of Characters (2)
Writing an Original Character (2, 3)
Creating Believable Characters (2, 3)
Bio Formats (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
Little Things You Can Add To Your Bios
Connections (2)
Titles
Bio Twists
Names
Female Names (2, 3, 4, 5)
Male Names (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Last Names  (2, 3, 4)
Personalities
Jung’s 16 Personality Types
Underused Character Personalities
Birth-Order: Personality Traits
The Difference Between Personality and Behavior
How to: Show a Characters Personality In a Paragraph
16 Character Traits
Underused Personalities
Personality Traits

Positive (2)
Negative (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)
Both (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)

Habits
Addictions and Bad Habits
Bad Habits
Character Habits
Character Quirks
Phobias (2)
Secrets
300 Possible Secrets to Give Your Characters
I Bet You Didn’t Know..
Character Plots And Secrets (2)
Celebrity Secrets
Secret Masterlist
Quotes
Song Lyrics Masterlist
Songs for Biographies
Favorite Quotes: TV and Movies
Favorite Quotes: Notable Authors
Favorite Quotes: Celebrities
Favorite Quotes: Popular Books (2)
Quotes From Songs
Character Quotes
Masterlist of Bio Lyrics
Masterlist of Bio Quotes
Masterlist of Song Lyrics
Biography Lyrics
A Masterlist of Quotes
+130 Quotes
The Quotation Garden
Mary Sue’s

A Mary Sue In The Inbox
Your Character Is A Sue, Not Just A Mary Or Gary
Not Writing A Mary Sue

→ WHILE ROLEPLAYING
Para Titles
100 Paragraph Titles
Para Titles - Song Title Edition (2,3)
A Whole Ton of Para Titles
350+ Song Titles
Para Titles For You (2)
Starters
How to: Create an interesting starter
How to: Make an Interesting Starter
Gif Conversations: A Guide
A Brief Guide to Starters
Interesting Gif Convesation Starters
Starters Masterlist
Gif Starter Posts
46 Interesting Gif Chat Starters
Ideas for Gif Chat Starters
Starters
Careers/Jobs
Masterlist: Jobs
Possible Careers for Characters
Artistic Occupations
Martha’s Vineyard Job Masterlist
Interesting Jobs
Locations/Settings/Activities
Para Ideas
Masterlist: Para Ideas
Top 50 Places for Starters
Writing Topics: Para Ideas
101 Date Ideas
68 Date Ideas
22 Date Ideas
Popular Places to Eat
Character Developement
Character Development Questionaire
Character Surveys
C.D. Questionaire
30 Day Character Development Meme
Character Development Questions (2)
100 Pt. Questionaire
IC and OOC Surveys
Online Test for Character Building
30 Days of Character Development
How to: Develop Characters
Get To Know Your Characters
→ ROMANCE
Romance (in general)
The Little Ways a Ship Gets Build
Roleplaying Relationships
8 Ways to Say I Love You
How to: Make a Set Ship RP Work
How to: Write a Romantic Scene
Do’s and Don’ts of Writing Relationships
Putting a Label on It
Synonyms for Love
Pregnancy (2, 3, 4, 5)
Smut
Smut Guide: Casual Sex
Smut Guide: For Beginners
How to: Write a First Time Sex Scene Romantically
How to: Smut - The Bare Bones
How to: Smut (For Virgins)
How to: Write Lesbian Smut
How to: Write Smut (2, 3)
How to: Write a Blowjob/Prepping for Smut
Smut Guides of Tumblr
Tips on Writing Sex Scenes
A Guide to Language in Smut
Domination and Submission
Making Love
A Smut Guide
Kisses
How to: Write a Kiss (2)
Different Types of Kisses
Writing Out the First Kiss
→ OTHER
Plot Writing
How to: Create the Best Plot for Your RP
How to: Create A Plot Outline in 8 Steps
How to: Write A Plot in 12 Steps
How to: Write A Quality Plot
How to: Spice Up Your Roleplay Plots
Components of Your Plot Page
Writing Up A Plot
Basics of Writing A Plot
Links for Plot Writing Help
Eight Unique Plot Ideas
Plot Twists
Situation Ideas (2, 3)
Guide to Plotting
Eras
Eras Masterlist
Everything You Need to Know Abut the 20’s
20’s Slang
Primary Sources on Ancient Civilizations
How to: Play the Greek Goddess ‘Harmonia’
How to: Roleplay In the Victorian Era
Victorian Dialogue

thewritersarchive:

This is an ultimate masterlist of many, many resources that could be helpful for writers/roleplayers.

→ GENERAL

Improvement

Describing

Masterlists

  Body Language

Grammar/Vocabulary

Writer’s Block

→ APPLICATIONS

Application (Itself)

Para (Sample)

Prompts

→ GUIDES

Personalities

Disorders

Disabilities

Jobs/Hobbies/Beliefs

Drugs

Locations

Genders

Supernatural

Other

→ CREATING CHARACTERS

Biography Writing

Names

Personalities

Personality Traits
Habits

Secrets

Quotes

Mary Sue’s

→ WHILE ROLEPLAYING

Para Titles

Starters

Careers/Jobs

Locations/Settings/Activities

Character Developement

→ ROMANCE

Romance (in general)

Smut

Kisses

→ OTHER

Plot Writing

Eras