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via source reblog posted 5 hours ago with 156,421 notes →
unexplained-events:

staragus:

unexplained-events:

When Caroline Walter of Freiburg, Germany died at the age of 16, her sister, ,Selma, had a sculptor cast a life size sculpture for the gravestone - Every morning since Caroline’s funeral, a fresh flower was found tucked in the crook of the arm, and still is to this day - Nobody knows who leaves it - Every single morning! - Caroline died in 1867 - For 146 years, someone has been leaving flowers…

Caroline totes had a vampire lover.

This is by far, my favorite theory.

unexplained-events:

staragus:

unexplained-events:

When Caroline Walter of Freiburg, Germany died at the age of 16, her sister, ,Selma, had a sculptor cast a life size sculpture for the gravestone - Every morning since Caroline’s funeral, a fresh flower was found tucked in the crook of the arm, and still is to this day - Nobody knows who leaves it - Every single morning! - Caroline died in 1867 - For 146 years, someone has been leaving flowers…

Caroline totes had a vampire lover.

This is by far, my favorite theory.

via source reblog posted 1 day ago with 8 notes →

thewritingrealm:

Hey, guys! I’m going to be spending a month in Australia, New Zealand, and Fiji! I’m doing homestays and such, surfing, scuba diving, and so much more so please bear with me while I’m gone- I’ll have a queue, don’t worry- and I’ll come back with so much information to share with you all for life and writing! 

via source reblog posted 2 days ago with 684 notes →
Write it. Shoot it. Publish it. Crochet it, sauté it, whatever. MAKE.

-

Joss Whedon

Book Geek Quote #539

(via bookgeekconfessions)

Pretty sure these are the lyrics to Technologic…

via source reblog posted 3 days ago with 244,435 notes →
thewritersarchive:

This is an ultimate masterlist of many, many resources that could be helpful for writers/roleplayers.
→ GENERAL
Improvement
Improve Your Writing Habits Now
5 Ways to Add Sparkle to Your Writing
Getting Over Roleplaying Insecurities
Improve Your Paras
Why the Right Word Choices Result in Better Writing
4 Ways To Have Confidence in Your Writing
Writing Better Than You Normally Do
How’s My Driving?
Describing
A Description Resource
55 Words to Describe Someones Voice
Describing Skin Colors
Describing a Person: Adding Details
Emotions Vocabulary
90 Words For ‘Looks’
Be More Descriptive
Describe a Character’s Look Well
100 Words for Facial Expressions
To Show and Not To Tell
Words to Describe Facial Expressions
Describing Clothes
List of Actions
Tone, Feelings and Emotions
Masterlists
Writing Specific Characters
Character Guides
Writing Help for Writers
Ultimate Writing Resource List
Lots of RP Guides
Online Writing Resources
List of Websites to Help You Focus
Resources for Writing Bio’s
Helpful Links for Writing Help
General Writing Resources
Resources for Biography Writing
Mental Ilnesses/Disorders Guides
8 Words You Should Avoid While Writing
  Body Language
Body Language Cheat
Body Language Reference Cheat
Tips for Writers: Body Language
Types of Crying
Body Language: Mirroring
Grammar/Vocabulary
Words Instead of Walk (2)
Commonly Confused Adjectives
A Guide on Punctuation
Common Writing Mistakes
25 Synoms for ‘Expession’
How to: Avoid Misusing Variations of Words
Words to Keep Inside Your Pocket
The 13 Trickiest Grammar Hang-Ups
Other Ways to Say..
Proofreading
300+ Sophiscated and Underused Words
List of Misused Words
Words for Sex
100 Beautiful and Ugly Words
Words to Use More Often
Alternatives for ‘Smile’ or ‘Laugh’
Three Self Editing Tips
Words to Use Instead of ‘Walk’, ‘Said’, ‘Happy’ and ‘Sad’
Synonyms for Common Words
Alternatives for ‘Smile’
Transitional Words
The Many Faces and Meanings of ‘Said’
Synonyms for ‘Wrote’
A Case Of She Said, She Said
Writer’s Block
How to: Cure Writer’s Block
Some Tips on Writer’s Block
Got Writer’s Block?
6 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block
Tips for Dealing With Writer’s Block
→ APPLICATIONS
Application (Itself)
How to: Make That Application Your Bitch
How to: Make Your App Better
How to: Submit a Flawless Audition
10 Tips for Applying
Para (Sample)
Para Sample Ideas
5 Tips on Writing an IC Para Sample
Writing an IC Sample Without Escaping From the Bio
How to: Create a Worthy IC Para Sample
How to: Write an Impressive Para Sample
How to: Lengthen Short Para’s
Prompts
Drabble Stuff
Prompts List
Writing Prompts
Drabble Prompts
How to Get Into Character
Writing Challenges/Prompts
A Study in Writing Prompts for RPs
Para Prompts & Ideas
Writing Prompts for Journal Entries
A List of Para Starters
→ GUIDES
Personalities
Angry
Bad Asses
Bitches (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
Childishness
Emotional Detachment
Flirtatious
The Girl Next Door
Introverts (2)
Mean Persons (2)
Psychopaths
Party Girls
Rich (2) 
Rebels
Sarcasm
Serial Killers (2)
Shyness (2, 3)
Sluts
Villains (2)
Witt
Disorders
Disorders in general (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Attention Deficit Disorder
Antisocial Personality Disorder
Anxiety (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Avoidant Personality Disorder
Alice In Wonderland Syndrome
Bipolar Disorder (2, 3)
Cotard Delusions
Depression (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)   
Eeating Disorders (2, 3)
Facitious Disorders
Histrionic Personality Disorder
Multiple Personality Disorder (2)
Narcissistic Personality Disorder
Night Terrors
Kleptomania (2)
A Pyromaniac
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Psychopaths
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (2) (3)
Sex Addiction (2)
Schizophrenia (2)
Sociopaths (2)
Disabilities
Aspergers Syndrome
Apathy 
Autism
Someone Blind (2)
Cancer (2, 3)
Disability
Dyslexia
Muteness (2, 3)
Stutter
Jobs/Hobbies/Beliefs
Actors
Ballet Dancer (2)
Christianity
Foreigners
Gamblers
Hinduism
Hitmen
Satanism
Smokers
Stoners
Taoism
Journalists
Vegetarians
Drugs
Alcohol Influence (2, 3, 4, 5)
Cocaine Influence
Ecstasy Influence (2)
Heroin Use
LSD Influence
Marijuana Influence (2, 3)
Opiate Use
Locations
Australia
Boston
California (2, 3)
England/Britain (2, 3, 4, 5)
New York
Prison
London
The South (2)
Genders
Females (2)
Males (2)
Transgender People
Supernatural
Vampires
Witches (2)
Werewolves
Other
Amnesia
Children
A Death Scene
Loosing Someone (2)
Old Persons
Physical Injuries (2, 3)
Sexual Abuse (2)
Fight Scenes (2, 3, 4)
Horror
Torture
→ CREATING CHARACTERS
Biography Writing
Components of Your Biographies
Character sheet (2, 3)
Need Help With Character Creation?
How to: Draw Inspiration for Characters From Music
How to: Write a Biography (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11)
How to: Write a Fully Developed Character
How to: Create a Cast of Characters (2)
Writing an Original Character (2, 3)
Creating Believable Characters (2, 3)
Bio Formats (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
Little Things You Can Add To Your Bios
Connections (2)
Titles
Bio Twists
Names
Female Names (2, 3, 4, 5)
Male Names (2, 3, 4, 5) 
Last Names  (2, 3, 4)
Personalities
Jung’s 16 Personality Types
Underused Character Personalities
Birth-Order: Personality Traits
The Difference Between Personality and Behavior
How to: Show a Characters Personality In a Paragraph
16 Character Traits
Underused Personalities
Personality Traits

Positive (2)
Negative (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)
Both (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)

Habits
Addictions and Bad Habits
Bad Habits
Character Habits
Character Quirks
Phobias (2)
Secrets
300 Possible Secrets to Give Your Characters
I Bet You Didn’t Know..
Character Plots And Secrets (2)
Celebrity Secrets
Secret Masterlist
Quotes
Song Lyrics Masterlist
Songs for Biographies
Favorite Quotes: TV and Movies
Favorite Quotes: Notable Authors
Favorite Quotes: Celebrities
Favorite Quotes: Popular Books (2)
Quotes From Songs
Character Quotes
Masterlist of Bio Lyrics
Masterlist of Bio Quotes
Masterlist of Song Lyrics
Biography Lyrics
A Masterlist of Quotes
+130 Quotes
The Quotation Garden
Mary Sue’s

A Mary Sue In The Inbox
Your Character Is A Sue, Not Just A Mary Or Gary
Not Writing A Mary Sue

→ WHILE ROLEPLAYING
Para Titles
100 Paragraph Titles
Para Titles - Song Title Edition (2,3)
A Whole Ton of Para Titles
350+ Song Titles
Para Titles For You (2)
Starters
How to: Create an interesting starter
How to: Make an Interesting Starter
Gif Conversations: A Guide
A Brief Guide to Starters
Interesting Gif Convesation Starters
Starters Masterlist
Gif Starter Posts
46 Interesting Gif Chat Starters
Ideas for Gif Chat Starters
Starters
Careers/Jobs
Masterlist: Jobs
Possible Careers for Characters
Artistic Occupations
Martha’s Vineyard Job Masterlist
Interesting Jobs
Locations/Settings/Activities
Para Ideas
Masterlist: Para Ideas
Top 50 Places for Starters
Writing Topics: Para Ideas
101 Date Ideas
68 Date Ideas
22 Date Ideas
Popular Places to Eat
Character Developement
Character Development Questionaire
Character Surveys
C.D. Questionaire
30 Day Character Development Meme
Character Development Questions (2)
100 Pt. Questionaire
IC and OOC Surveys
Online Test for Character Building
30 Days of Character Development
How to: Develop Characters
Get To Know Your Characters
→ ROMANCE
Romance (in general)
The Little Ways a Ship Gets Build
Roleplaying Relationships
8 Ways to Say I Love You
How to: Make a Set Ship RP Work
How to: Write a Romantic Scene
Do’s and Don’ts of Writing Relationships
Putting a Label on It
Synonyms for Love
Pregnancy (2, 3, 4, 5)
Smut
Smut Guide: Casual Sex
Smut Guide: For Beginners
How to: Write a First Time Sex Scene Romantically
How to: Smut - The Bare Bones
How to: Smut (For Virgins)
How to: Write Lesbian Smut
How to: Write Smut (2, 3)
How to: Write a Blowjob/Prepping for Smut
Smut Guides of Tumblr
Tips on Writing Sex Scenes
A Guide to Language in Smut
Domination and Submission
Making Love
A Smut Guide
Kisses
How to: Write a Kiss (2)
Different Types of Kisses
Writing Out the First Kiss
→ OTHER
Plot Writing
How to: Create the Best Plot for Your RP
How to: Create A Plot Outline in 8 Steps
How to: Write A Plot in 12 Steps
How to: Write A Quality Plot
How to: Spice Up Your Roleplay Plots
Components of Your Plot Page
Writing Up A Plot
Basics of Writing A Plot
Links for Plot Writing Help
Eight Unique Plot Ideas
Plot Twists
Situation Ideas (2, 3)
Guide to Plotting
Eras
Eras Masterlist
Everything You Need to Know Abut the 20’s
20’s Slang
Primary Sources on Ancient Civilizations
How to: Play the Greek Goddess ‘Harmonia’
How to: Roleplay In the Victorian Era
Victorian Dialogue

thewritersarchive:

This is an ultimate masterlist of many, many resources that could be helpful for writers/roleplayers.

→ GENERAL

Improvement

Describing

Masterlists

  Body Language

Grammar/Vocabulary

Writer’s Block

→ APPLICATIONS

Application (Itself)

Para (Sample)

Prompts

→ GUIDES

Personalities

Disorders

Disabilities

Jobs/Hobbies/Beliefs

Drugs

Locations

Genders

Supernatural

Other

→ CREATING CHARACTERS

Biography Writing

Names

Personalities

Personality Traits
Habits

Secrets

Quotes

Mary Sue’s

→ WHILE ROLEPLAYING

Para Titles

Starters

Careers/Jobs

Locations/Settings/Activities

Character Developement

→ ROMANCE

Romance (in general)

Smut

Kisses

→ OTHER

Plot Writing

Eras

via source reblog posted 4 days ago with 1,867 notes →
Writing is an exploration. You start from nothing and learn as you go.

- E. L. Doctorow (via maxkirin)
via source reblog posted 5 days ago with 843 notes →
Hi there!! I'm trying to decide whether I want to write my story in third person or first person. Can you list some pros and cons of each? Thanks!! :)

whataboutwriting:

When it comes to matters like this one, I don’t think pros and cons really exist. It’s a matter of what works best for your story and your characters. Therefore, I’ll point out a list of some of the most prominent aspects of the two perspectives, and leave it for you to decide what fits your story best.

First person perspective:

  • Direct connection between your character and your readers. Your readers will be “living” inside your character’s mind for as long as the story lasts, and therefore they will get to have a faster connection with the character they’re learning the story from. 
  • Limited information. Everything we learn is limited to what your character has experienced. Anything important that happens when your character is not present cannot be learnt by the reader unless someone describes the event to your character. (Assuming you are going to be writing from the perspective of only one character. This certainly doesn’t apply if you will be alternating between perspectives).
  • Subjective Narrative. With a first person perspective, your readers have less room to evaluate situations and characters, as their perspectives will always be clouded by the character’s. If you want your readers to judge situations and characters, you might have it harder if you choose to go with a first person narrative.
  • More intimate and realistic story. In real life, we live inside our own selves, and therefore, when we’re reading a story that’s written in first person narrative, we get a more realistic feeling of it. It’s like we’re actually inside the story, rather than just listening to it. 
  • Show don’t tell? It’s harder to show instead of telling when it comes to a first person narrative. It definitely can be done, but some books written from a first person perspective often end up with a lot more telling than showing - which isn’t always a drawback. Telling instead of showing is often done a lot more efficiently in books written from a first person perspective and you can often get away with telling more than showing when you’re going for a first person perspective rather than a third person one.
  • Too much introspection. When we are reading book written in first person, we often find ourselves dwelling inside the characters mind while they wonder about every single worldly problem and thinks about the meaning of their own life. Does it really matter to the story line? More often than not, no, it doesn’t. It might be great for character development, hence why introspection shouldn’t be completely eradicated, but it definitely slows down the story and takes the focus out of what really matters.

Third person perspective:

  • Possibility of omniscience. Of course, you can write from a third person perspective and still not have an omniscient narrator - that’s where third person limited comes in, in which case the advantages and drawbacks of its use would be similar to those of first person perspectives -, but here you can be omniscient and that can be both good and bad. It definitely makes it harder to create suspense - If you have an omniscient narrator and hide things from your readers they could have known all along, they might feel cheated. On the other hand, they can receive more knowledge than they would with a first person perspective or a third person limited one.
  • Character Emphasis. It gives you the opportunity to develop all your characters equally, have your readers know a bit about all of them and put emphasis on more than one person at the same time.
  • Too Much Information. When you have a God-like narrator, that knows everything about everyone, you often run the risk of providing the reader with information they definitely don’t need. You want to develop your characters and your settings so much that you forget to ask yourself whether the information you are including is actually relevant to the story line. While in first person narration you run the risk of too much introspection, here you run the risk of feeling like your readers need so much information that you end up giving them all at once. Space out your info dumps, if you’re going to go with this sort of perspective, and all will be well.
  • More quick scene transitions. Third person narration allows you to jump between scenes faster, because you can leave one character having dinner in New York and then pick up the story with another character back in London.
  • Distancing the readers and the characters. Again, this can be both good and bad. You have a harder job allowing your readers to connect with your characters, but at the same time you always allow them to judge them by their own values. You give your readers the freedom to form an opinion on your characters and settings that is not clouded by anyone’s perception but their own. 

Ultimately, try choosing what you think works best for your story and what fits your purpose best. Good luck!

For further reading:

via source reblog posted 6 days ago with 112 notes →
sebastianrpc:


You have a roleplay that’s based in a private school or boarding school, well I’m here to help you get a better understanding of private schools and boarding schools.
So I am writing this guide, because while I know there are others out there, I feel like they miss out on some important things that are needed. I’ve also seen some that are very wrong as information goes, that is even about a basic private school. I also know that many RPs (especially glee rps) like to put their characters at private schools, and I feel like some guidance is needed.
First thing to note, almost everything at private school is a rule of some kind. They have rules for everything, literally.Second thing most of this is taken from my experiences of a lifetime at a private school in America. The last section of this guide will be more aimed towards Glee RPs (but can be applied to RPs in general).
This guide will also be focused more on high school, than on other schools, because unless you are writing a book, the others aren’t needed for roleplay.
I should also note that I spent 14 years at a private school, and had plenty of interaction with all girls schools, all boys schools, boarding schools, private schools, Christian private schools, and college prep schools.
Read More

sebastianrpc:

You have a roleplay that’s based in a private school or boarding school, well I’m here to help you get a better understanding of private schools and boarding schools.

So I am writing this guide, because while I know there are others out there, I feel like they miss out on some important things that are needed. I’ve also seen some that are very wrong as information goes, that is even about a basic private school. I also know that many RPs (especially glee rps) like to put their characters at private schools, and I feel like some guidance is needed.

First thing to note, almost everything at private school is a rule of some kind. They have rules for everything, literally.Second thing most of this is taken from my experiences of a lifetime at a private school in America. The last section of this guide will be more aimed towards Glee RPs (but can be applied to RPs in general).

This guide will also be focused more on high school, than on other schools, because unless you are writing a book, the others aren’t needed for roleplay.

I should also note that I spent 14 years at a private school, and had plenty of interaction with all girls schools, all boys schools, boarding schools, private schools, Christian private schools, and college prep schools.

Read More

via source reblog posted 1 week ago with 254 notes →
Heeeey, so I'm writing a story that I really love, but I've hit a road bump. There's a scene that I have to write that is crucial to the plot, but from a writer's (and likely reader's) perspective, the scene is boring. Do you have any advice on spicing up important but dull scenes???

maxkirin:

Hello there, writerly friend~ ♥︎

I like you, because this is a question I have been meaning to tackle for ages! I’m super excited to finally get a chance to talk about this :D

Before we begin, though, I want to give the usual disclaimer that the following is not gospel. It’s just my take on this situation. Consider this advice as building blocks. Take the ones you like, play around with them, and make them work for your own writing style~ ♥︎

And, with that out of the way, let’s take it from the top!

There’s a scene that is crucial to the plot, but it’s boring to write. How do I deal with this?

Well, those of you who have been following my blog for a while know my stance on writing— and that it should be FUN. If you (as the writer) feel like what you are writing is boring, then your readers will most likely agree. Just ask your English teacher if they can tell when a student actually enjoyed writing a paper c;

But, what if this scene happens to be important to the plot? Well, I think that there are two ways to go about this, but before we talk about them— I need you to be honest with yourself.

Is this scene really that important?

Seriously. Take a deep breathe. Step out of your story, and look at it objectively. Do you really need to have that scene? If you were looking at it as a movie, would this scene make it to the final cut, or would it end up as a ‘deleted scene’? I have an example of this that I have been using for ages, so let’s look over it again c;

Barry Prespen is a Wizard working for the San Francisco Police Department as a freelance Detective.

In Barry’s world, there are lots of supernatural creatures bumping about in the night.

The Elves and the Vampires don’t like each other, they are going to hold a council to talk about a possible peace treaty. The writer of this story knows that this scene is important, because it will show the Elves and Vampires trying to find a happy medium but ultimately ending in bloodshed. This scene is important, as it will strike the match that sets the plot in flame (if you may c;).

The problem? The writer finds this scene to be incredibly boring to write. Who wants to listen to a bunch of old men talking politics for 30+ pages? Nobody, that’s who.

So, the writer finds himself at a fork in the road.

☆ One way to fix this: “Get To The Point” ☆

What I generally do in a situation like this is to define the point of the scene at hand. In the example above, the whole point of that scene is to show that the Elves and the Vamps where unable to reach a happy medium and that the bloodshed has launched the entire supernatural world into an all-out war. Now, take a deep breath, and consider the following:

"How can I give the reader this information, without boring them?"

Seriously, it’s as simple as that. Find a way to give this information to the reader, and then go about with your job (which is to tell the story c;). In the example above, the writer decided to do this:

The next morning, just as Barry wakes up from a horrible hangover— he gets a call from his contact in the Elven District. Barry’s jaw drops to the floor. The Vampire and Elven negotiations ended in the death of the Elven Prince. Shit just hit the fan. Barry picks up his coat and heads out the door, head spinning as he takes a cab to the Elven District.

Boom. Done. I’m glad we didn’t have to spend 30+ pages listening to old men talking about politics (of all things, politics). Now the writer get’s to do what they like the most— write about Barry trying to get himself out of yet another rut with the supernatural creatures of Chicago, er I mean, San Francisco :p

But, that is not the only way to go about solving this problem…

☆ The other way to fix this, “Make It Fun” ☆

Now, let’s say that you still think the scene needs to happen. What do you do now? You have a scene that you don’t find fun to write, but you must write it… so, why not MAKE IT FUN :D? Seriously. Step aside. Take a deep breath, and ask yourself: what would make this scene more fun to write? Here’s what the writer of the example story would do:

Barry is at the pub, drinking away the night after another shift of battling supernatural creatures… when suddenly a member of the Elven court taps on his shoulder. Barry is taken by force to the Vampire/Elf negotiations to act as a mediator. Barry of course tries to not get involved, but as the only person to effectively interact with all the leaders of the supernatural clans… he’s actually the most qualified person to be the mediator. Barry stands in the middle of the council room, Elves on one side and Vampires on the other. He does not know it yet… but the fate of two clans, and the people of San Francisco, balance on his ability to keep these supernatural creatures from killing each other.

Now, THAT is something that sounds fun to write. The writer loves putting Barry in horrible situations and watch him struggle to find a way to save his ass. This is exactly what the writer needed. He gets to show the death of the Elven Prince— except now the entire Elven clan will blame this on nobody but… our unfortunate protagonist!

Oh, can you taste the drama? I love it!

PS: If you’re looking for more advice on making a scene fun, I have an old video just about that c;

Sorry for the long post! I hope this helps~ I really do feel that, ultimately, writing should be FUN. You don’t have to write boring scenes. Seriously. Either do away with them— or find a way to make them fun. If you have any more questions, make sure to send them my way!

Want more writerly content? Make sure you follow my blog for your daily dose of writing advice, prompts and writerly inspiration: maxkirin.tumblr.com!

via source reblog posted 1 week ago with 574 notes →
pureempath:

i —— foreword

Fairly recently I realized that a lot of writers and US citizens alike don’t really know and fully understand their rights when being arrested/interrogated.  This is mostly a writing guide but if you’re a US citizen this stuff is just useful to know.  Basically, the police won’t tell you most of your rights aside from what you know — but they don’t even explain those.  I hope this helps. 

ii —— being arrested

If you are not served with a warrant, the police can not arrest you.  They can say they have one, but unless they show it to you, you don’t have to cooperate with them.  Upon being arrested, you will be read your rights.
        “You have the right to remain silent.  Anything you say           or do can be held against you in the court of law.  You           have the right to an attorney, if you can not afford one           you will be provided one without any cost to you.”
Every so often the police officers fail to say this to the suspect before the questioning session and usually that results in negative consequences for the officers involved.  What they don’t tell you is that you are allowed to have an attorney present before and during your questioning.  They also don’t tell you that what you don’t say and do can be held against you.  An example of this is, say you’re being accused of murder.  If you sit there expressionless and stoic while they’re telling you that you killed your mother its gonna seem suspicious and they can use that in their favor.  Now, in that same respect if you sit there sweating and vehemently denying it — they can use that against you as well.
Alright, they also don’t tell you that you can accidentally forfeit your ‘right to remain silent’ (fifth amendment right).  If you say “I didn’t kill my mother.” you just gave up your right to remain silent.  They will likely try to provoke you to say something like this that will make you give up this right.  That’s why you want a lawyer present during and before your questioning.

iii —— interrogation techniques

There are a lot so I’ll only be outlining a few major things.  Additionally, this guide is only applicable to lawful interrogations of arrested individuals that are US citizens and do not fall under the “terrorist" category, because military interrogations are quite a bit different.  I might touch on that later.
The room is set up strategically.  In almost every interrogation room, there is a table, two chairs, and a mirror/one way glass.  The suspect sits on one side of the table, a police officer on the other, and the interrogator stands.  The sitting police officer serves to corroborate and support the other police officer, or participate in the good cop/bad cop facade.  The one sitting will usually pretend to be more friendly and try to feed you the age old lie “if you just tell the truth it won’t be as bad”.
The sitting cop will also look for microexpressions and pay attention to body language while the standing cop will generally pace around and give off aggressive vibes to intimidate you, the suspect.
On rare occasions, you can be questioned without being served a warrant.  During these times, you have not been read your rights most likely and you do not have to cooperate.  Sometimes its in your best interest, other times its not.  Either way you don’t have to stay.  On other occasions they are allowed to detain you for up to 12 hours but that is exceptionally rare.
The police officers questioning you will try to make you trip up on your own story.  They do this mainly by trying to speed up the process so you have less time to think and process — the aggressive body language comes into play here.  If you feel threatened you’re more likely to stutter and stumble around than if you have a clear mind.
If they’re having a difficult time getting you to start talking, they’ll ask you harmless questions — questions usually about your family members, your birthday, etc.  These are always things they know already but it gets the metaphorical ball rolling.  Along with that, they can establish a baseline of what your body language is when you’re telling the truth so they know when you’re lying.

iv —— "enhanced interrogation" techniques

As far as the less lawful interrogations go, just keep in mind that all pain would have to start at a minimal level and incrementally increase in intensity to be effective.  You also have to factor in disorientation due to pain and possibly blood loss.  At a certain point in time, your subject will realize they are going to die and there is no going back and they will stop caring.  If they think it could possibly stop, you can get information out of them.  There always has to be the possibility of getting out of it alive.  Or you could also kidnap someone close to them and hurt them in front of your subject if that works.
The most commonly known about method is waterboarding, but its not the most widely used.  The mechanics are basic, actually.  Some sort of material is wrapped over the subject’s head — like a thick canvas material, or plastic — and water is poured over it.  Essentially they feel like their drowning but you are just asphyxiating them.  Its more mental torture than anything else.
Sometimes hypothermia is used, and that is basically just taking the subject’s clothing and putting them in a room about 50* F.  Then every couple of minutes the subject is doused in cold water.
A very common technique is to shake the subject and that is fairly self explanatory, I believe.  Not enough to hurt them, just enough to instill fear that you will.  An open handed slap to the face or abdomen is also used.  Punching is usually not employed by the government because it harms the prisoner, but if you’re talking about another country or a rogue operative, maybe a drug dealer — who knows.
Sometimes it is as simple as making the subject stand in one place in the same position for hours.  It causes intense strain on the muscles and is usually quite effective.

v —— end thoughts

I could have gotten a lot more in depth on a lot of this but I felt I covered it enough to give a general idea.  I do hope this helps people write these sort of things more accurately, or maybe even if they get into a scuttle with law enforcement (which I hope does not happen).  If you have any questions, comments, or anything additional that I should add, don’t hesitate to contact me.

pureempath:

i —— foreword

Fairly recently I realized that a lot of writers and US citizens alike don’t really know and fully understand their rights when being arrested/interrogated.  This is mostly a writing guide but if you’re a US citizen this stuff is just useful to know.  Basically, the police won’t tell you most of your rights aside from what you know — but they don’t even explain those.  I hope this helps. 

ii —— being arrested

If you are not served with a warrant, the police can not arrest you.  They can say they have one, but unless they show it to you, you don’t have to cooperate with them.  Upon being arrested, you will be read your rights.

        “You have the right to remain silent.  Anything you say
          or do can be held against you in the court of law.  You
          have the right to an attorney, if you can not afford one
          you will be provided one without any cost to you.”

Every so often the police officers fail to say this to the suspect before the questioning session and usually that results in negative consequences for the officers involved.  What they don’t tell you is that you are allowed to have an attorney present before and during your questioning.  They also don’t tell you that what you don’t say and do can be held against you.  An example of this is, say you’re being accused of murder.  If you sit there expressionless and stoic while they’re telling you that you killed your mother its gonna seem suspicious and they can use that in their favor.  Now, in that same respect if you sit there sweating and vehemently denying it — they can use that against you as well.

Alright, they also don’t tell you that you can accidentally forfeit your ‘right to remain silent’ (fifth amendment right).  If you say “I didn’t kill my mother.” you just gave up your right to remain silent.  They will likely try to provoke you to say something like this that will make you give up this right.  That’s why you want a lawyer present during and before your questioning.

iii —— interrogation techniques

There are a lot so I’ll only be outlining a few major things.  Additionally, this guide is only applicable to lawful interrogations of arrested individuals that are US citizens and do not fall under the “terrorist" category, because military interrogations are quite a bit different.  I might touch on that later.

The room is set up strategically.  In almost every interrogation room, there is a table, two chairs, and a mirror/one way glass.  The suspect sits on one side of the table, a police officer on the other, and the interrogator stands.  The sitting police officer serves to corroborate and support the other police officer, or participate in the good cop/bad cop facade.  The one sitting will usually pretend to be more friendly and try to feed you the age old lie “if you just tell the truth it won’t be as bad”.

The sitting cop will also look for microexpressions and pay attention to body language while the standing cop will generally pace around and give off aggressive vibes to intimidate you, the suspect.

On rare occasions, you can be questioned without being served a warrant.  During these times, you have not been read your rights most likely and you do not have to cooperate.  Sometimes its in your best interest, other times its not.  Either way you don’t have to stay.  On other occasions they are allowed to detain you for up to 12 hours but that is exceptionally rare.

The police officers questioning you will try to make you trip up on your own story.  They do this mainly by trying to speed up the process so you have less time to think and process — the aggressive body language comes into play here.  If you feel threatened you’re more likely to stutter and stumble around than if you have a clear mind.

If they’re having a difficult time getting you to start talking, they’ll ask you harmless questions — questions usually about your family members, your birthday, etc.  These are always things they know already but it gets the metaphorical ball rolling.  Along with that, they can establish a baseline of what your body language is when you’re telling the truth so they know when you’re lying.

iv —— "enhanced interrogation" techniques

As far as the less lawful interrogations go, just keep in mind that all pain would have to start at a minimal level and incrementally increase in intensity to be effective.  You also have to factor in disorientation due to pain and possibly blood loss.  At a certain point in time, your subject will realize they are going to die and there is no going back and they will stop caring.  If they think it could possibly stop, you can get information out of them.  There always has to be the possibility of getting out of it alive.  Or you could also kidnap someone close to them and hurt them in front of your subject if that works.

The most commonly known about method is waterboarding, but its not the most widely used.  The mechanics are basic, actually.  Some sort of material is wrapped over the subject’s head — like a thick canvas material, or plastic — and water is poured over it.  Essentially they feel like their drowning but you are just asphyxiating them.  Its more mental torture than anything else.

Sometimes hypothermia is used, and that is basically just taking the subject’s clothing and putting them in a room about 50* F.  Then every couple of minutes the subject is doused in cold water.

A very common technique is to shake the subject and that is fairly self explanatory, I believe.  Not enough to hurt them, just enough to instill fear that you will.  An open handed slap to the face or abdomen is also used.  Punching is usually not employed by the government because it harms the prisoner, but if you’re talking about another country or a rogue operative, maybe a drug dealer — who knows.

Sometimes it is as simple as making the subject stand in one place in the same position for hours.  It causes intense strain on the muscles and is usually quite effective.

v —— end thoughts

I could have gotten a lot more in depth on a lot of this but I felt I covered it enough to give a general idea.  I do hope this helps people write these sort of things more accurately, or maybe even if they get into a scuttle with law enforcement (which I hope does not happen).  If you have any questions, comments, or anything additional that I should add, don’t hesitate to contact me.

via source reblog posted 1 week ago with 68,498 notes →
In Which Diversity Isn’t a Myth

clementive:

Ok. I’m tired of the typical vampire, werewolf and fairy.I’m also tired of the occidental-centrism in mythology. Hence, this list. 

I tried to include as many cultural variants as I could find and think of. (Unfortunately, I was restricted by language. Some Russian creatures looked very interesting but I don’t speak Russian…) Please, add creatures from your culture when reblogguing (if not already present). It took me a while to gather all those sites but I know it could be more expansive. I intend on periodically editing this list. 

Of note: I did not include specific legendary creatures (Merlin, Pegasus, ect), gods/goddesses/deities and heroes.

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